Elméleti Idegtudomány és Komplex Rendszerek Kutatócsoport https://wigner.hu/hu hu 2021_Theoretical Neuroscience and Complex Systems Research Group https://wigner.hu/hu/node/2319 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">2021_Theoretical Neuroscience and Complex Systems Research Group</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h4><strong>2021</strong></h4> <p><strong>Optimal electrode design for spike sorting. </strong>— We examined how the geometrical arrangement of electrodes influences spike sorting efficiency, and formalised the principles for the design of electrode systems enabling optimal spike sorting performance. The clustering performance of KlustaKwik, a popular toolbox, was evaluated using semi-artificial multi-channel data, generated from a library of real spike waveforms recorded in the CA1 region of mouse Hippocampus in vivo. Based on spike sorting results under various channel configurations and signal levels, a simple model was established to describe the efficiency of different electrode geometries. Model parameters can be inferred from existing spike waveform recordings, which allowed quantifying both the cooperative effect between channels and the noise dependence of clustering performance. Based on the model, analytical and numerical results can be derived for the optimal spacing and arrangement of electrodes for one- and two-dimensional electrode systems (Fig. 1), targeting specific brain areas [<a href="https://doi.org/10.1088/1741-2552/ac0f49">1</a>].</p> <img alt="EIKR1" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="070f9798-5617-447d-8d21-1dd457523e01" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/EIKR1.png" width="500" class="align-center" /> <p> </p> <img alt="EIKR2" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="e0555e69-df91-48d2-ba93-b5f9d2821db5" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/EIKR.png" width="500" class="align-center" /> <p><em>Figure 1. Functional efficiency of 32-channel electrode grids, as a function of the normalized inter-electrode distance: a) Original sinal to noise ratio (SNR range 8.3 − 47.7) b) SNR = 37.5 for all spikes. While the linear probe showed the highest efficiency at its maximum, its performance depends heavily on the inter-electrode distance and SNR.</em></p> <p><strong>Network Path Convergence Shapes Low-Level Processing in the Visual Cortex.</strong> — Hierarchical counterstream via feedforward and feedback interactions is a major organizing principle of the cerebral cortex. The counterstream, as a topological feature of the network of cortical areas, is captured by the convergence and divergence of paths through directed links. So defined, the convergence degree (CD) reveals the reciprocal nature of forward and backward connections, and also hierarchically relevant integrative properties of areas through their inward and outward connections. We asked if topology shapes large-scale cortical functioning by studying the role of CD in network resilience and Granger causal coupling in a model of hierarchical network dynamics. Our results indicate that topological synchronizability is highly vulnerable to attacking edges based on CD, while global network efficiency depends mostly on edge betweenness, a measure of the connectedness of a link. Furthermore, similar to anatomical hierarchy determined by the laminar distribution of connections, CD highly correlated with causal coupling in feedforward gamma, and feedback alpha-beta band synchronizations in a well-studied subnetwork, including low-level visual cortical areas. In contrast, causal coupling did not correlate with edge betweenness. Considering the entire network, the CD-based hierarchy correlated well with both the anatomical and functional hierarchy for low-level areas that are far apart in the hierarchy (Fig 2). Conversely, in a large part of the anatomical network where hierarchical distances are small between the areas, the correlations were not significant. These findings suggest that CD-based and functional hierarchies are interrelated in low-level processing in the visual cortex. Our results are consistent with the idea that the interplay of multiple hierarchical features forms the basis of flexible functional cortical interactions [<a href="https://doi.org/10.3389/fnsys.2021.645709">2</a>].</p> <img alt="EIKR3" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="4745b77f-1dfb-4343-9f08-63a1ffc23e95" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/EIKR3.png" width="600" class="align-center" /> <p><em>Figure 2. Relationship of the additive inverse of the weighted convergence degree (invCDw) with the SLN (fraction of supragranular labeled neurons) and the DAI (directed influence asymmetry index) in the 8 × 8 subgraph od labellad anatomical areas. (A) The invCDw shows a significant negative correlation in the alpha-band and a significant positive correlation in the gamma-band similar to that found for the SLN. Interestingly, the invCDw shows almost the exact level of correlation in the alpha-band (for feedback connections) as the SLN, whereas in the gamma-band (for feedforward connections) it is somewhat lower. (D) There is a significant positive correlation between the invCDw and the multifrequency DAI (mDAI, p &lt; 10 −6 ).</em></p> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/hu/user/124" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="13566@wigner.mta.hu">Dovicsin-Pénte…</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">h, 08/29/2022 - 17:00</span> <div class="field field--name-field-ev field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Év</div> <div class="field__item"><time datetime="2022-08-29T12:00:00Z" class="datetime">h, 08/29/2022 - 12:00</time> </div> </div> Mon, 29 Aug 2022 15:00:00 +0000 Dovicsin-Péntek Csilla Klára 2319 at https://wigner.hu 2020_Theoretical Neuroscience and Complex Systems https://wigner.hu/hu/node/1727 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">2020_Theoretical Neuroscience and Complex Systems </span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h4><strong>2020</strong></h4> <p><strong>Reorganization of Large-Scale Functional Networks During Low-Frequency Electrical Stimulation of the Cortical Surface. </strong>— In a research carried out with the National Institute of Clinical Neuroscience, we examined the rearrangement of the functional brain network of epileptic patients undergoing brain surgery under the influence of direct, cortical stimulation with graph theory parameters. Our most important finding is that a more integrated network topology appears when stimulating the seizure onset zone than when stimulating outside the the seizure onset zone. This difference is more pronounced in patients who have been suffering from the disease for more time, so presumably the brain lesions associated with epilepsy are more conserved in their functional network (Fig. 1).</p> <img alt="elméleti idegtudomány 1" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="c7270dae-8149-4a2f-af2c-a9febe222c1c" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/elmeleti_idegtudomany1.jpg" width="600" class="align-center" /> <p><em><strong>Figure 1. </strong>Network of the propagating response to an electric stimulation. White circles and the orange flash sign between them denote the two electrodes used for the stimulation. Green area shows the resection area on the surface of the brain. </em></p> <p><strong>Acute blockade of NR2C/D subunit-containing NMDA receptors modifies sleep and neural oscillations in mice. </strong>— We found that NR2C/D blockade changed the slep structue as the time spent in slow‐wave and rapid eye movement sleep decreased, but the time spent in quiet wakefulness increased. Furthermore, there was a significant decrease of sleep spindle oscillation density. These findings highlight the importance of NR2C/D‐containing NMDARs and take a step towards establishing a link between electrophysiological correlates of psychiatric disorders and underlying synaptic dysfunctions.</p> <img alt="elméleti idegtudomány 2" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="7287e25e-24c0-4e51-8fbc-c1fdc0992e60" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/elmeleti_igedtudomany2.png" width="600" class="align-center" /> <p> <br /> <em><strong>Figure 2.</strong> Small and large synaptic buttons in primate cortex. The two types can be distinguished by their surface and volume as well as along the principal components of their ultrastructural features.</em></p> <p><strong>Synaptic organization of cortico-cortical communication in primates.</strong> — We have shown that in primates, including humans, in the cerebral cortex, axon terminals can be grouped into small and large types based on their three-dimensional ultrastructural properties. Using three-dimensional electron microscopic serial section reconstruction, we found a strong correlation between surface and volume, so that it also separated the two types of axon ends. Multivariate principal component analysis of ultrastructural features confirmed the applicability of the above categorization. Based on our results, it can be assumed that interactions in the cerebral cortex in primates also occur basically through two channels: 1) strong but rapidly decaying signaling through large axon terminals and 2) weak, long-decay modulating signaling through small axon terminals (Fig. 2).</p> <p><strong>References:</strong><br /> [1] <a href="https://www.worldscientific.com/doi/10.1142/S0129065719500229">DOI: 10.1142/S0129065719500229</a><br /> [2] <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jsr.13257">DOI: 10.1111/jsr.13257</a><br /> [3] <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/ejn.14905">DOI: 10.1111/ejn.14905</a></p> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/hu/user/124" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="13566@wigner.mta.hu">Dovicsin-Pénte…</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">h, 02/22/2021 - 15:38</span> <div class="field field--name-field-ev field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Év</div> <div class="field__item"><time datetime="2020-01-02T12:00:00Z" class="datetime">cs, 01/02/2020 - 12:00</time> </div> </div> Mon, 22 Feb 2021 14:38:51 +0000 Dovicsin-Péntek Csilla Klára 1727 at https://wigner.hu 2019_Theoretical Neuroscience and Complex Systems Research Group https://wigner.hu/hu/node/1507 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">2019_Theoretical Neuroscience and Complex Systems Research Group</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h4><strong>2019</strong></h4> <img alt="elmeleti idegtudomany 1" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="db76ba01-abdd-4917-b708-a1a4cee44a65" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/elmeleti_idegtud1.png" width="400" class="align-center" /><img alt="elmeleti idegtudomany 2" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="701188cf-bcc4-4483-b57c-b385b91a3fe0" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/elmeleti_idegtud2.png" width="400" class="align-center" /> <p><br /> <em>Figure 1. Reconstruction of the Intrinsic Optical Signal (IOSh) based on the measured Local Field Potential (LFP). A: The temporal evolution of the LFP during evoked epileptic activity of the brain slice. B-D: Comparison of the measured (red) and the reconstrucetd IOSh signal (blue). The reconstruction follows the measurement through different dynamic regimes.</em></p> <p><strong>Causality analysis between electrical signals of neural activity and the intrinsic optical signal of the neural tissue.</strong> — Causal relationship between local field potential (LFP) and intrinsic optical signal (IOS) in evoked epileptiform activity in vitro brain slices was investigated. The parallel IOS and LFP recordings were performed by Sándor Borbély and Ildikó Világi (Eötvös Loránd University). As far as we know, this work was the first conclusive application of the Sugihara’s new causality method, the cross-convergent mapping (CCM) in neuroscience. As CCM is the first causality analysis method which can reliably detect the circular connection, we were in the position of investigating the question, whether only the evoked epileptic activity causes the intrinsic optical signal IOS, or there is a feedback mechanism as well, and the ion concentration changes measured by the IOS influence the termination or the renewal of the epileptic activity.During preprocessing, two components of the IOS signal have been distinguished: a faster, activity dependent component (IOSh) which changes its sign between transmitted and reflected light measurements thus it is related to the reflectance or the dispersion of the tissue and a slower component (IOSl), which is negative in both cases, thus can be attributed to the increase of the absorption of the tissue. We found only unidirectional causal drive from the electric towards the optical signal, but this work demonstrated several phenomena which are instructive for further investigation: We found, that the correlation was small between the LFP and the IOSh at the time of the actual causal effect and the peaks of the cross correlation function did not reflect the actual causal dependency in this case. In stead, the temporal derivative of the IOSh was correlated with the LFP power at the time delay of the causal peak. Based on these observations, a simple model have been set up to describe the dependency of the IOSh on the LFP power and IOSh was reconstructed, based on the LFP signal (Fig. 1.). Besides the actual results, we believe that this study demonstrates, that it is possible to calculate the causality between two data series with drastically different time scales and provides useful know-how for application of causality analysis for any field of science<a href="https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-41554-x"> [1]</a>.</p> <p><strong>Emergence of polarized opinions from free association networks.</strong> — We developed a method that can identify polarized public opinions by finding modules in a network of statistically related free word associations. Associations to the cue “migrant” were collected from two independent and comprehensive samples in Hungary (N<sub>1 </sub>= 505, N<sub>2</sub> = 505). The co-occurrence-based relations of the free word associations reflected emotional similarity, and the modules of the association network were validated with well-established measures. The positive pole of the associations was gathered around the concept of “Refugees” who need help, whereas the negative pole associated asylum seekers with “Violence” (Fig. 2). The results were relatively consistent in the two independent samples. We demonstrated that analyzing the modular organization of association networks can be a tool for identifying the most important dimensions of public opinion about a relevant social issue without using predefined constructs) <a href="https://doi.org/10.3758/s13428-018-1090-z">[2]</a>.<br />  </p> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/hu/user/124" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="13566@wigner.mta.hu">Dovicsin-Pénte…</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">sze, 07/01/2020 - 13:11</span> <div class="field field--name-field-ev field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Év</div> <div class="field__item"><time datetime="2019-01-02T12:00:00Z" class="datetime">sze, 01/02/2019 - 12:00</time> </div> </div> Wed, 01 Jul 2020 11:11:20 +0000 Dovicsin-Péntek Csilla Klára 1507 at https://wigner.hu 2018_Theoretical Neuroscience and Complex Systems Research Group https://wigner.hu/hu/node/913 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">2018_Theoretical Neuroscience and Complex Systems Research Group</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h4><strong>2018</strong></h4> <p>Analysis of complex systems in the brain and beyond  <br /> <br /> We showed by using 3D electron microscopic reconstructions and quantitative comparisons that each pathways of the hierarchical circuitry of the somatosensory cortex forms two kinds of synaptic contacts: one exhibiting structural properties, which permit signal transmission at high fidelity, and another with morphological properties of the modulatory type. These findings are crucial in understanding the dynamics of interactions of the different hierarchically organized cortical pathways. The manuscript summarizing these findings is about submission. <br /> <br /> The directed interactions have been determined among the variables of a lake ecosystem, via a new causality analysis method. Causality analysis indicated that the observed eutrophication signals were induced by climate change, which altered the phosphate, the fito- and the zooplacton interactions.<br /> <br /> A new data analysis method has been developed to generate an electric imaging, based on  parallel recordings on intrinsic optical and local field potential by a transparent electrode array. The new method makes possible the fusion of the two methods, by exploiting the advantages of bot, the excellent spatial resolution of the optical imaging and the excellent temporal resolution of the electric signal (Fig. 1).<br /> <img alt="zs1" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="88235d80-ff3d-46d7-9d8b-19e2ed60fd5c" height="411" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Z%20S%201.jpg" width="619" /></p> <p><em><strong>Figure 1.</strong>  Comparison between optically and electrically derived orientation preference maps. The white dashed frame on the grayscale vascular image (A) shows the position of the 32-channel microelectrode array inside the investigated A17 region. Traditionally processed orientation preference map (B) and electrical orientation preference map derived from the evoked ECoG responses to the visual stimuli (C) are shown. </em></p> <p>Schizophrenia is a chronic and severe mental disorder that affects how a person thinks, feels, and behaves, putting significant burden on caregivers and society. The goal of our research is to identify druggable molecular targets in a hope to ameliorate the life of people suffering from this disease. A new project targeting the fundamental question of molecular, system and functional level causes of Schizophrenia was started in 2018 in collaboration with Semmelweis University funded by Gedeon Richter Plc. During this year a new experimental laboratory was set up and preliminary results generated to elaborate on a possible role of NR2C containing NMDA receptors in generating sleep disturbances underlying decreased memory performance, a key symptom of Schizophrenia.</p> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/hu/user/171" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Werovszky Veronika</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">sze, 06/26/2019 - 10:46</span> <div class="field field--name-field-ev field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Év</div> <div class="field__item"><time datetime="2018-01-02T12:00:00Z" class="datetime">k, 01/02/2018 - 12:00</time> </div> </div> Wed, 26 Jun 2019 08:46:07 +0000 Werovszky Veronika 913 at https://wigner.hu 2017_Theoretical Neuroscience and Complex Systems Research Group https://wigner.hu/hu/node/1506 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">2017_Theoretical Neuroscience and Complex Systems Research Group</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h4><strong>2017</strong></h4> <p>We have published a new data analysis method, called skCSD, to reveal membrane currents on single neurons, based on extracellular multichannel electrode array measurements. The new method provides higher precision in membrane current source density reconstruction due to the inclusion of the morphology information into the calculation. We have applied the new method to the first available parallel extracellular and intrancellular data and showed the spatial propagation of the currents during action potential generation on the dendritic branches of the cell. (Fig. 1) The scripts for the analysis, written in R, were tested and made publicly available as an open source program package.</p> <p><img alt="aaa" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="24e26817-df12-42c2-845a-3a64cc9c9659" height="365" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/AA_0.jpg" width="575" /></p> <p><strong><em>Figure 1:</em></strong><em> Left: Electrode positions (stras) and reconstructed morphology of the pyramid cell from the CA1 region of the rat hippocampus. The color coded circles on the electrodes show the measured momentary electric potential at the moment of the peak of an action potential generated by the neuron. Right: The reconstructed current source density distribution along the dendritic tree of the neuron. Warm colors mark inward positive currents to the neuron (sink) cold colors mark the outward currents from the neuron (sources).</em></p> <p>We have published the first results on the analysis of the parallel recordings on intrinsic optical and local field potential by a transparent electrode array. The new method makes possible the fusion of the two methods, by exploiting the advantages of both, the excellent spatial resolution of the optical imaging and the excellent temporal resolution of the electric signal.</p> <p>We applied our coherence clustering method, to determine the cortical structures and areas from the measurements with the transparent cortical surface electrode grid, parallel to the intrinsic optical signal measurement. The methodology and the first results were published on a conference and in a proceedings journal.</p> <p>We created a new feedback model of the dynamics of gene expression and protein synthesis on the basis of experimental findings. We built a stochastic kinetic model to investigate and compare the “traditional” and the feed-back model of genetic expression processes. Qualitative and quantitative changes in the shape and in the numerical characteristics of the stationary distributions of proteins and RNA molecules suggest that more combined experimental and theoretical studies should be done to uncover the details of the kinetic mechanisms of gene expressions.</p> <p>We showed that in the somatosensory cortical circuitry, which is largely responsible for tactile perception, lateral interactions mostly depend on the intra-areal connections complemented by the neuronal feedback originating from areas with higher order functional representations. In contrast, feedforward connections from lower order areas exhibit spatially restricted lateral spread indicating higher functional specificity. Our results also suggest that the population activity is mostly determined by the target regions of the feedforward connections overlapping the strong local input within an area. The manuscript including these findings has been submitted for publication and is now under major revision.</p> <p>To better understand somatosensory, and in general cortical communication, we studied the synaptic organization of the above mentioned connections in 3D by way of electron microscopy. Using state of the art data analyses techniques we found that the size of axon terminals is an important distinguishing morphological feature of the cortical synapses. We also found that the size of the mitochondria and postsynaptic densities (the active zone of the signal transmission) relative to the size of the axon terminals also exhibit important distinguishing characteristics and that their positive correlation can be explained by the energy need of synaptic transmission. The manuscript summarizing these findings is going to be submitted soon. </p> <p>Our ongoing studies show that the robustness and synchronizability of the network of cortical areas is especially sensitive to targeted removal of the network edges on the basis of their convergence degree introduced previously by our group. </p> <p>By including a Bayesian evaluation algorithm, the development of our new causality analysis method, now we call it dimensional causality method (DC), has been completed. The DC method has been tested on various simulated systems, such as coupled Lorentz systems, coupled logistic maps and coupled Hindmarsh-Rose models. These simulated dynamical systems pose different challenges towards the DC algorithm but we found, that all the DC method was able to infer all possible causal relations (unidirectional, circular, independent and hidden common cause) in all the three model cases. Preliminary applications were made on neurophysiological data from epileptic patients, during photostimulation experiment and during epileptic seizure.</p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/hu/user/124" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="13566@wigner.mta.hu">Dovicsin-Pénte…</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">v, 07/01/2018 - 13:10</span> <div class="field field--name-field-ev field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Év</div> <div class="field__item"><time datetime="2017-01-02T12:00:00Z" class="datetime">h, 01/02/2017 - 12:00</time> </div> </div> Sun, 01 Jul 2018 11:10:11 +0000 Dovicsin-Péntek Csilla Klára 1506 at https://wigner.hu Research https://wigner.hu/hu/node/911 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Research</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>Publications</strong><br /> <strong>Articles</strong><br /> 1. Bokodi V, Tóth E, Somogyvári Z, Maglóczky Zs, Entz L, Erőss L, Ulbert I, Fabó D: P308<br /> Cross-frequency coupling in the human epileptic hippocampus. CLIN NEUROPHYSIOL<br /> 128:(9) e277/1-1 (2017)<br /> 2. Cserpán D, Meszena D, Wittner L, Toth K, Ulbert I, Somogyvari Z, Wojcik DK: Revealing<br /> the distribution of transmembrane currents along the dendritic tree of a neuron from<br /> extracellular recordings. eLIFE 6: e29384/1-35 (2017)<br /> 3. Kecskés I, Burkus E, Bazsó F, Odry P: Model validation of a hexapod walker robot.<br /> ROBOTICA 35:(2) 419-462 (2017)<br /> 4. Matsuzawa T, Zalányi L, Kiss T, Érdi P: Multi-scale modeling of altered synaptic<br /> plasticity related to Amyloid effects. NEURAL NETWORKS 93: 230-239 (2017)<br /> 5. Somogyvári Z, Érdi P: From phase transitions to the topological renaissance: Comment<br /> on “Topdynamics of Metastable Brains” by Arturo Tozzi et al. PHYS LIFE REV 21: 23-25<br /> (2017)<br /> 6. Somogyvári Z, Hajnal B, Halász P, Erőss L, Fabó D: P372 Inference of intra and inter<br /> hippocampal directed causal relationships based on foramen ovale recordings. CLIN<br /> NEUROPHYSIOL 128:(9) e299/1-1 (2017)<br /> 7. Szalisznyó K, Silverstein D, Teichmann M, Duffau H, Smits A: Cortico-striatal language<br /> pathways dynamically adjust for syntactic complexity: A computational study. BRAIN<br /> LANG 164: 53-62 (2017)<br /> 8. Wadhwa RR, Zalányi L, Szente J, Négyessy L, Érdi P: Stochastic kinetics of the circular<br /> gene hypothesis: Feedback effects and protein fluctuations. MATH COMPUT SIMULAT<br /> 133: 326-336 (2017)<br /> 9. Zátonyi A, Borhegyi Z, Cserpán D, Somogyvári Z, Srivastava M, Kisvárday Z, Fekete Z:<br /> Optical imaging of intrinsic neural signals and simultaneous microECoG recording using<br /> polyimide implants. PROCEEDINGS 1: 610/1-4 (2017) (Eurosensors 2017, Paris, France,<br /> 3-6 September 2017)<br /> <strong>Conference proceedings</strong><br /> 10. Beltz H, Fülöp A, Wadhwa RR, Érdi P: From ranking and clustering of evolving networks<br /> to patent citation analysis. In: IJCNN 2017 International Joint Conference on Neural<br /> Networks (Anchorage (AK), USA, 14-19 May 2017), IEEE Neural Networks Society,<br /> ISBN:9781509061815, 2017, pp. 1388-1394<br /> 11. Érdi P: The brain-mind computer trichotomy: Hermeneutic approach. In: Proc. AIC<br /> 2016 - 4th International Workshop on Artificial Intelligence and Cognition (New York,<br /> USA, 16-17 July 2016), Eds.: Vernon D, Lieto A, Bhatt M, Oltramari A, CEUR Workshop<br /> Proceedings; 1895., Aachen: CEUR-WS.org, 2017. pp. 106-116<br /> <strong>Book, book chapter</strong><br /> 12. Érdi P, Sen Bhattacharya B, Cochran AL (eds.): Computational neurology and<br /> psychiatry. Springer International Publishing, ISBN:978-3-319-49959-8, 2017 pp. 1- 448<br /> 13. Érdi P, Matsuzawa T, John T, Kiss T, Zalányi L: Connecting epilepsy and Alzheimer’s<br /> disease: Modeling of normal and pathological rhythmicity and synaptic plasticity<br /> related to amyloidββ (Aββ) effects. In: Computational Neurology and Psychiatry. Eds.:<br /> Érdi P, Sen Bhattacharya B, Cochran AL, Springer International Publishing, ISBN:978-3-<br /> 319-49959-8, 2017. pp. 93-120</p> <p> </p> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/hu/user/171" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Werovszky Veronika</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">k, 06/26/2018 - 09:38</span> Tue, 26 Jun 2018 07:38:22 +0000 Werovszky Veronika 911 at https://wigner.hu